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Workers' Compensation Archives

Construction workers' safety equipment can save lives

Many workers in Connecticut know just how important safety hardware can be on the job, especially in dangerous conditions or when working at great heights. This was vividly illustrated by the family of a worker who was injured in the March 2018 bridge collapse at Florida International University, where a recently installed 950-ton bridge crashed to the ground above a busy highway. One worker at the bridge heard a cracking sound and then locked his harness, according to his cousin, who attributes his cousin's life to the safety equipment.

Worker injuries at stake with fall arrest systems

Connecticut employees who work in high places are often at risk of on-the-job injuries and accidents. Since these types of worksites are associated with damaging falls and other injuries, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has established strong standards for fall arrest equipment. One of these regulations sets the strength of anchor points that can be used at work sites as part of a fall arrest program.

OSHA enforcement necessary to protect workers

For employees in Connecticut and across the United States, the threat of workplace accidents and injuries is all too real. Far too many workers face unsafe conditions on a daily basis. The former head of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration emphasized in testimony before a subcommittee of the House of Representatives that in order to provide protections for these workers, strong enforcement and implementation of standards is necessary, because voluntary employer programs tend to be ineffective in improving workplace conditions.

Tips for avoiding cold stress while working

In Connecticut, working outside during the winter comes with certain hazards. Workers are especially at a risk for developing cold stress, which occurs when skin temperature and internal temperature get so low that the body cannot warm itself. The three main types of cold stress include hypothermia, frostbite and trench foot.

OSHA provides safety tips for snow removal

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is more than familiar with the dangers that workers face when removing snow. The federal organization has investigated cases of people being suffocated in snow, falling from snow-covered roofs and having body parts amputated through contact with snow blowers. This is why outdoor workers in Connecticut should know about the tips that OSHA offers for safe snow removal.

GAO report sees need for greater meatpacking oversight

Connecticut residents and other meatpacking employees may not have access to bathroom breaks or medical treatment for injuries or exposure to chemicals. The General Accountability Office is urging the federal government to make sure that such workers have the protection they need on the job. The issue relating to a lack of bathroom breaks was caught by Oxfam America, and it went unnoticed by OSHA, according to the GAO report issued on Dec. 7.

For 6 years running, fall protection tops OSHA violation list

Each year, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration releases a list of the most frequently cited workplace safety violations nationwide. Employees in Connecticut and other states who work in logistics, bulk transportation and other industries may be interested in knowing that fall protection leads the Top 10 Violations List for 2017 and has now done so for six consecutive years.

Blind spots happen off the road, too

Workers in Connecticut rely on their employers to establish and comply with proper safety procedures. Without these processes, all employees are at risk of on-the-job injuries that can have life-changing consequences. One area that employers sometimes ignore is that of the "blind spot" that workers can have while going about their daily tasks.

How to keep all workers safe despite their age

According to a Pew Research Center analysis of federal data, 18.1 percent of the workforce is age 65 or older. This means that employers in Connecticut and elsewhere may have to create safety plans that take into account various experience levels. They may also need to incorporate a variety of cultures and areas of expertise. Employers will also want to make sure that they aren't stereotyping workers while delivering messages that they are likely to best receive.

Falls a common cause of worker deaths

There were 937 reported deaths on construction job sites throughout the country in 2015. Of those deaths, 350 were related to falls, which means that it was the most common cause of accidental worker fatalities according to OSHA. To help make Connecticut workers and others safer, OSHA has been levying fines in certain cases. Repeat offenders tend to be more likely than others to face financial penalties after a violation.

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