Skilled Defense In Embezzlement Cases

Embezzlement is a form of larceny that occurs when one person who has access to another person's property takes the property for his or her own use. There are a few different forms of embezzlement that you can be accused of in the state of Connecticut. Our experienced attorney at Cummings Law Firm in Waterbury has years of experience handling a wide variety of while collar criminal matters, including embezzlement cases.

Federal Vs. State

Embezzlement can be considered a federal or a state crime. You can be accused of federal embezzlement if you commit this crime across state lines. One example of federal embezzlement is mail fraud, in which you are mailing funds throughout multiple states. If you are accused of federal crime, a government agency has the right to investigate and prosecute you. You will be prosecuted in a federal court if you are accused of federal embezzlement. On the other hand, if you commit embezzlement in one state, you will be charged in that state alone. Local police will investigate and prosecute you, and you will go to court in a local court.

Types Of Embezzlement Charges

There are different degrees of embezzlement, just as there are different degrees of crimes like assault. For embezzlement, there are six degrees that a person can commit. The definitions for these forms of embezzlement are as follows:

  • First-degree embezzlement. The most severe form of embezzlement, this is committed if someone embezzles property worth more than $20,000.
  • Second-degree embezzlement. Second-degree embezzlement occurs when property worth $10,000-$20,000 is embezzled.
  • Third-degree embezzlement. If property worth $2,000-$10,000 is embezzled, third-degree embezzlement occurs.
  • Fourth-degree embezzlement. If property worth $1,000-$2,000 is embezzled, this is considered fourth-degree embezzlement.
  • Fifth-degree embezzlement. This occurs when property worth $500-$1,000 is embezzled.
  • Sixth-degree embezzlement. When property worth $500 or less is embezzled, you will face a sixth-degree embezzlement charge.

Penalties For An Embezzlement Conviction

The penalties for these forms of embezzlement are as follows:

  • First degree (class B felony) is punishable by a fine of up to $15,000 and a prison sentence of 1-20 years.
  • Second degree (class c felony) is punishable by a prison sentence of 1-10 years as well as a fine of $10,000.
  • Third degree (class D felony) can be punished by a fine of up to $5,000 and 1-5 years in prison.
  • Fourth-degree Embezzlement (class A misdemeanor) is punishable by a fine of up to $2,000 and a jail sentence of a year.
  • Fifth-Degree Embezzlement (class B misdemeanor) is punishable by a jail sentence of up to 6 months and a fine of up to $1,000.
  • Sixth-degree embezzlement (class D misdemeanor) can be punished by a $500 fine and a jail sentence of up to 3 months.

If you have been accused of embezzlement, whether it is considered a federal or state charge, you need to be proactive. By contacting a lawyer at Cummings Law Firm, you will be able to start building your defense, and you will have the burden of establishing your defense lifted off of you. For more information please contact us online or call us at 203-754-7779.